Casual gardening…

15th June 2022

This time, it was definitely a Monarch butterfly.

It landed on the milkweed by the front door.

Just long enough for a photo.

Hopefully it will lay eggs.

From what I understand, Monarchs feed exclusively on milkweed. When we first came here, we wondered how we could find a supply, but we need not have worried.

In the Spring, a few plants pushed their way up in my flowerbeds and it turned out they are prolific.

Grant’s improved flowerbed was intended to accommodate one or two new plants, for the sake of bees and other butterflies. I am having to relocate some of the milkweed which is taking over.

On right is, I think, a form of spirea. Don’t take my word for it, though!

This morning our first lily bloomed.

We were talking about gardening this morning, as we drove along and I said that I prefer flowers to grow wherever they happen to come up, rather than in any sort planned way.

Which is just as well, considering.

It’s not your actual manicured garden, mine.

More of a free-for-all.

Although we have a large crop of milkweed, the Monarchs have competition…

This hairy chap would appear to be a gypsy moth.

It posed for me prettily, moving into the sun to show off its fine accoutrements.

But I don’t get too friendly. Many of those things make a person itch and I have trouble enough with all the other blighters.

Competition is the daily state of things lately.

Mama Groundhog cast a dubious eye toward the garden path, late yesterday:

“Peanut” had arrived.

While around the corner….

Mama Raccoon was sitting down for supper.

Not long after, another young buck arrived. This one a bit younger than the first, judging from its developing antlers.

Then Grant called out to tell me one of the babies had found peanuts on the porch.

It had climbed up to a small table under the window.

How did such a tiny creature get up there? Some time back, Grant bought a set of pet steps for arthritic Penny but the cats scoffed at it, so we put it out, on the porch.

It may appear that we cater rather a lot.

But it’s much less than it seems. We offer seed and peanuts and suet for whoever gets here first.

With so many fledglings, this time of year, we up the amount for a while.

Yes, we do supply carrots, partly to distract groundhogs from flowers. Also because these tiny creatures need to grow really fast before their hibernation in October.

The groundhogs live in a burrow under our hedges so while they are certainly not tame and not encouraged to be, I feel very protective of them.

But feeding wildlife as such is illegal and not the right thing to do. Hard as it sometimes seems.

The deer come to graze on our grass and are attracted by the apple trees. When the apples fall, Grant collects them and cuts them up to make them easier for the deer to eat, but I don’t think that counts as feeding.

The fox found something out in the field. There is no shortage of rodents!

This month’s full moon was supposedly called “Strawberry” and I had some fun:

In the end I ventured outside, braving flying crawly things, just to get the same old image:

But I rather like the one on left. It just happened to have a pink tint which I have never seen before.

6 thoughts on “Casual gardening…

    1. We always have water in several locations. I think the concern about feeding wildlife is that their numbers will increase as their habitat shrinks. Also bears can be dangerous. Mostly it’s for the benefit of people not animals, of course. Our personal concern is that the birds and animals find easy food and do not learn to find natural sources. Hopefully it balances. It is so sad to see the natural world shrinking. Basically it’s why I came here from outside Seattle.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. How beautiful is that open lily … and still a lot more to open … that should make a wonderful photo! Lovely to see all the animals coming over to enjoy some treats (and it’s definitely not feeding … the food just happen to be out there for whoever wants it … well, that’s anyway my thought on this 😊). Yes, I also noticed the pink tint around the moon – maybe that’s why it’s called a “strawberry” moon.

    Liked by 1 person

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